Dr. Kathleen Anne Welsh-Bohmer, Ph.D. joins NeuroCog Trials as VP for Neurodegenerative Disorders

Dr. Kathleen Anne Welsh-Bohmer, Ph.D. joins NeuroCog Trials as VP for Neurodegenerative Disorders

 

Dr. Kathleen Anne Welsh-Bohmer, a leading scientific expert in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) research, has joined NeuroCog Trials (NCT) as the Vice President of Neurodegenerative Disorders.

Dr. Welsh-Bohmer will lead the ongoing development of new technology and tools such as wearables and custom in-house assessments, designed to support customers conducting clinical trials for dementia and other cognitive disorders.

Her work includes neuropsychology leadership in the Takeda Pharmaceutical’s TOMMORROW STUDY, the largest, industry-sponsored, Phase 3 clinical trial of its kind with a focus on the secondary prevention of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to AD. The methods her team developed for this study filled an information void and led to the validation of a genetic biomarker that will help to accelerate global clinical trials in AD prevention.

Dr. Richard Keefe, Co-Founder and CEO of NeuroCog Trials, said “Dr. Welsh-Bohmer has been an esteemed colleague and partner on several global clinical trials and I am delighted to have her join NCT as we continue to offer pharmaceutical companies validated technological solutions to address this enormous unmet need.”

With a company committed to innovation and meeting the most rigorous scientific standards, Dr. Welsh-Bohmer’s expertise is a valuable addition to NCT. “Seen as one of the most challenging areas of drug development, the Alzheimer’s treatment and prevention landscape requires quickly evolving regulatory guidance and disruptive therapeutic approaches. As one of the true leaders in the AD scientific research field, Dr. Welsh-Bohmer brings that expertise to our team and our clients’ projects.”

Dr. Welsh-Bohmer is a Professor of Psychiatry and Neurology at Duke University. She also serves as the Director of Alzheimer’s Disease Clinical Trials within the Duke Clinical Research Institute.